Idda 2019 Etna Rosso

£35.00
In stock
SKU
ITSIRIDER19B

Etna wine producer Alberto Graci has teamed up with Barbaresco legend Angelo Gaja to create Idda. The name is taken from the Sicilian dialect for 'she', a term of endearment that the locals use to refer to Mt Etna. This is Gaja's first joint venture and if Etna weren't already on the radar of fine wine lovers, it certainly will be now. We are incredibly excited to have a small allocation of this fantastic wine

This Month's Mixed Cases

The Region

Sicilly

Sicily

Sicily is on a roll. It is a vast vineyard, 2nd largest after Veneto, of course producing wines at all quality levels, but a surprisingly high average. During the 1990s it was all about international varieties, but ever since, the Island has learned to celebrate its native varieties and now more than ever there are great reasons to look here for top quality wines. There are many DOCs, but the vast majority of wine is produced at IGT level. Producers have a little more freedom to experiment with varieties and winemaking techniques, without being hampered by local DOC laws, in the same way that Languedoc in France has done. Because of this, we tend to think of Sicily as the 'New World' of Italy.

The story begins with Nero d'Avola: the most widely planted of the black varieties here. The average quality is high, but it only gets so good. If you want to seek wines of greater distinction and delicacy, then look towards Etna. This smoking volcano is home to some of Italy's most exciting wines, and is progressing at such a break-neck pace, we can hardly keep up. This year sees the release of the first wines from Idda, a collaboration between Gaja of Piedmont and Alberto Graci, a native of the island and wine producer in Etna. We have also been won over by the delights of the whites of this DOC, most notably the wines of Santa Maria La Nave, who are making two extraordinary wines.

The Producer

Gaja

Gaja was founded in Barbaresco in 1859 by Giovanni Gaja. It wasn't until the fourth generation of the dynasty, Angelo Gaja, who took charge in 1961 that the company modernised - first of all by working with only their vineyards, reducing yields etc., furthered by introducing practices Angelo had seen in his travels in Burgundy, such as ageing the wines in small French oak barrels. Angelo was, and still is to a certain extent, a maverick, although now he is seen much more as an establishment figure. Angelo remains the figurehead of the company. However, it is the fifth generation of Gaia (pictured), Rossj, and Giovanni, now leading the various aspects of the operation.

In the early nineties, the family branched out from their home of Piedmont, initially buying vineyards in Montalcino, what eventually became Pieve Santa Restituta, followed by acquisitions of vineyards in Bolgheri for their Cà Marcanda. Not satisfied with conquering Piedmont and Tuscany, Gaja has entered a joint venture in Sicily with a traditional Etna producer Alberto Graci, creating Idda. The latest news is a project underway in Alta Langa, taking them full circle back to their home of Piedmont.

The Producer

Idda by Graci & Gaja

Idda by Graci & Gaja

This is a project that has anticipated for many years, being the subject of much excitement in the Italian wine scene. Etna wine producer Alberto Graci has teamed up with Barbaresco legend Angelo Gaja to create Idda. The first release is now out and it is their 2017 Red which will be followed by their 2018 White. The name is taken from the Sicilian dialect for 'she', a term of endearment that the locals use to refer to Mt Etna. This is Gaja's first joint venture and if Etna weren't already on the radar of fine wine lovers, it certainly will be now. We are incredibly excited to have a small allocation of this fantastic wine

More Like This

Collections

Volcanic Wines

Volcanic wines, a fascinating category within oenology, derive their distinct characteristics from the geological composition of volcanic soils. These rock formations and soils, formed by ancient lava and ash deposits, impart unique mineral nuances to the grapes. High minerals like potassium, magnesium, and iron influence the vines' growth and the subsequent wine profile.

Volcanic wines often exhibit pronounced acidity, attributed to the soil's poor water retention, which stresses the vines and promotes high-quality grape development. The mineral-rich environment encourages gradual ripening and imparts a remarkable complexity to the final product. Sulphur and volcanic gases in the soil may influence the wine's aromatic compounds and ageing potential.

Furthermore, the porous nature of volcanic soils aids root penetration, extracting distinct flavour compounds from deep within the earth. This intricate interplay of geological elements results in wines with a captivating interplay of minerality, vibrant acidity, and a sense of place that truly reflects the tumultuous origins of their vineyards.

For further reading, we recommend John Szabo's comprehensive book on Volcanic Wines: Salt, Grit and Power.

Copyright © 2022 Noble Grape all rights reserved.